Standardized tests intentionally make some questions intimidating and confusing. Beware of this and you are less likely to be shaken.

The SAT

Scholastic Aptitude Test

The SAT (Scholastic Aptitude Test) is a standardized test used to assess a student’s preparedness for college. The exam is split up into four sections: Reading, Writing & Language, Mathematics and an optional Essay. The Math section is divided into two parts: one that permits calculator use and one that prohibits it, combining to form a single score (out of 800). The Reading and Writing & Language sections are combined to provide a single Verbal score (out of 800). Students’ SAT scores are reflected as a combination of their Verbal and Math scores, which can be "superscored" across multiple test dates.

Click here for more information on the SAT.

OUR PROCESS:
SESSIONS
HOMEWORK
PRACTICE TESTS
FEEDBACK

"Without Jesse's general guidance, along with the tutor from his company that he provided us with, I have no idea how my son would have been able to balance his schoolwork, college application tests and his varsity athletics. As a two-season athlete, Justin struggled with managing his time during his freshman year of high school, but once our HT tutor stepped in he began to understand how to maximize his efforts and maintain stability with his SAT prep. He didn't only help him understand how to excel at the test, but he taught him how to be a more efficient and independent kid." 

Justin R.

SAT  |  11th Grade  |  Trinity

WE HELP YOU DECIDE

IS THE SAT FOR ME?

The first step along the SAT path is deciding if it is an optimal or pertinent exam for students. We explain the distinctions between the SAT/ACT, and guide students towards selecting the ideal option to suit their specific needs.

 

WHEN TO START PREP

Ideally, students have 4-8 months of consistent test prep leading up to their first SAT. Students ought to aim to take the test at least twice: once (or twice) in the spring of their junior year, and again in the fall of their senior year. We are very careful to pace our prep programs properly, ensuring that students neither burn out or peak too early.

 

HOW TO SEQUENCE THE PREP

The first goal is to get students comfortable with the features, expectations and format of each section of the SAT. We then move onto strategies, both in the realm of general test-taking as well as how to tackle particular question types. Lastly, we turn to content, and create personalized curricula for students to master. All of these elements come together during our group test simulations, which allow students to continuously refine their abilities in real time.

 

 

OUR APPROACH

CUSTOMIZED

Our tutors are prepared to shape our SAT program to fit every individual student’s learning and personality type. Our programs are malleable, and our 30+ years of experience have equipped us to lead every student towards achieving their personal best on test day.

 

HOLISTIC

We approach test prep from a child-centric perspective, and are sure to cater to the needs of the human we’re working with, not only the student. We don’t try to make a child’s life fit into a test prep program; we make sure that test prep fits comfortably into a child’s life.

 

EXECUTIVE FUNCTIONING

As the test prep process proceeds, our eyes remain fixed on maximizing a student’s score on test day. However, there are a variety of test-taking skills and perspectives which will follow students beyond the day of the test. Our esteemed EF program is interwoven into our test prep, ensuring that students will gain lifelong skills on their way to achieving their optimal SAT score. We’ll help you change schools, and we might just change your life along the way.

 

 

 

FACTS ABOUT THE SAT

 

When and where can my child take the SAT?

The SAT is offered in March, May, June, August, October, November and December. Click here for access to a complete list of SAT Test Center Locations. Students may also need to take SAT II Subject Tests (many competitive colleges require them), which cannot be taken on the same day as the SAT I.

 

What is the test like?
There are four sections of the SAT: Verbal Reasoning (VR), Quantitative Reasoning (QR), Reading Comprehension (RC), Math Achievement (MA), and the Essay.

Reading (52 questions, 65 minutes)

Text sources (500-750 words) include:

- Passages from literature and nonfiction sources

- Informational graphics, such as charts, graphs, and tables (All data is accurate)

- Texts in the humanities, science, history, social studies, and career-related sources.

Writing & Language (44 questions, 35 minutes)

- There will be four passages, each representing one of the following categories: Careers, History/Social Studies, Humanities, Science. 

No-Calculator Math (20 questions, 25 minutes)

- 15 Multiple Choice

- 5 Grid-Ins

- 0 Extended Grid-In

- 0 Problem Solving and Data Analysis (PSADA)

- 8 Algebra

- 9 Advanced Math

- 3 Additional Topics

Calculator Math (38 questions, 55 minutes)

- 30 Multiple-Choice

- 7 Grid-Ins

- 1 Extended Grid-In

- 17 Problem Solving and Data Analysis (PSADA)

- 11 Algebra

- 7 Advanced Math

- 3 Additional Topics

Essay (50 minutes)

- Some colleges will require it, some will not.

- Essays will be based on “texts that examine in an accessible way ideas, debates, trends and the like in the arts, the sciences, and civic, cultural and political life”.

- It will be the same question every time: Explain how the author builds an argument

How Do I Register?

Visit the College Board website to register.

How is the SAT scored?

- Area Score (200-800): One for Math and one for Reading/Writing

- Composite Score (400-1600): Sum of two Area Scores

- Essay (6-24): Sum of three categories: Reading, Writing and Analysis of Text

Click here to see a sample SAT Score Report.

View/download our SAT one-sheet.

Contact Us

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New York, NY 10004

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Brooklyn, NY 11201

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jesse@hartmantutoring.com

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HARTMAN TUTORING LLC 
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